Influence of Species, Particle Size and Compacting Pressure on Impact Resistance Index and Water Resistance of Fuel Briquettes | Chapter 04 | Advances in Applied Science and Technology Vol. 6

The desirable characteristics of fuel briquettes are that they remain solid until they have served their function and also performed well as a fuel. The first aspect which is related to its physical and mechanical properties is mainly a function of the quality of the densification process for a given raw material. This paper reports the findings of a study on the effect of species, particle size and compacting pressure on impact resistance index and water resistance quality of fuel briquettes. Briquettes were compacted at room temperature using compacting pressure levels of 10 to 50 MPa. The briquetting process and physical properties test were conducted using standard laboratory procedures. Results indicate that species, compacting pressure and particle size of sawdust at 5% level of significance have significant effect on the impact resistance index and water resistance quality of briquettes. Additionally, compacting pressure of 40 MPa was adequate to produce briquettes with good impact resistance index irrespective of the species. However, briquettes produced did not have good water resistance quality. The multiple correlation coefficient (R) and adjusted R2 for the regression model between impact resistance index of briquettes, and species density and compacting pressure were 0.74 and 0.54 respectively. Additionally, the multiple correlation coefficient and adjusted R2 for the regression model between water resistance quality, and species density, particle size and compacting pressure were 0.82 and 0.67 respectively. The above therefore suggests that even though briquettes produced from sawdust of tropical hardwoods at room temperature using low compacting pressure have adequate impact resistance index, they need to be protected from moisture.

Author(s) Details

Stephen Jobson Mitchual
Department of Construction and Wood Technology Education, University of Education, Winneba, Kumasi Campus, P.O.Box 1277, Kumasi, Ghana.

Read full article: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/view/72/865/667-1
View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/aast/v6

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