Ergonomics Workstation Assessment of Musculoskeletal Disorders in a Nigerian University | Chapter 13 | Current Trends in Disease and Health Vol. 2

This study examines the experiences of musculoskeletal discomfort among staff and students of the University of Port Harcourt as it relates to their workstations. Questionnaires were designed to extract information from respondents on their experience of musculoskeletal pains and other discomforts. A total of 320 questionnaires were distributed randomly to staff and students across the three campuses of the University of Port Harcourt. One hundred and forty (140) questionnaires were distributed to staff (academic, 60 and non-academic, 90) out of which 115 were retrieved. Similarly, 170 questionnaires were distributed to students out of which 163 were retrieved; altogether 278 out of 320 yielded a 86.9% response rate. The study revealed that there is a strong relationship between the workstation set up and development of musculoskeletal discomfort in classrooms and offices at the University of Port Harcourt. Most staff and students experienced low back and neck pains due to poor ergonomic practices. Furthermore, most of the students respondents spent their reasonable time sitting in class receiving lectures (47%) and studying/reading (18.3%), respectively. While a handful of students (9%) stood for most of the time receiving lectures; due to limited number of seats. A multiple regression analysis on workstation against MSDs (lower backaches, headaches, neck & upper backaches and neck & shoulder aches) yielded a coefficient of variance, R2 of 87%. The sensitivity analysis on the regression model gave the following results: R2 = 29.94, 1.23, 41.7, and 14.12% for workstation against i) lower backaches; ii) headaches; iii) neck & upper backaches; iv) neck & shoulder aches, respectively. The result of Kruskal-Walli’s test of significance on the questionnaire response to simple ergonomic workstation (the cause) and those of musculoskeletal disorder (the effect) showed not significant. This  confirmed the consistency of responses (that is, the samples were from the same distribution). Kendall’s w-statistic for staff and students level of agreement < 50% in all cases. 

Author(s) Details

Ify L. Nwaogazie
Centre for Occupational Health, Safety and Environment, Institute of Petroleum Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria.

Ken K. Umeadi
Centre for Occupational Health, Safety and Environment, Institute of Petroleum Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria.

Oghenefejiri Bovwe
Centre for Occupational Health, Safety and Environment, Institute of Petroleum Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria.

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Assessment of Antimalarial Drug Use among the Patients in a Tertiary Hospital in Northern Part of Nigeria | Chapter 05 | Current Trends in Disease and Health Vol. 1

Aims: To assess the pattern of antimalarial drug use among the patients attending the teaching hospital in Jos North local Government of Nigeria.

Study Design: Cross-sectional study.

Place and Duration of Study: Tertiary hospital in Jos North Local Government of Plateau state of Nigeria, between July and September, 2012.

Methodology: A sample size of 441 male and female patients was selected into this study using a universal sampling. Information on the knowledge, attitudes and practices with respect to antimalarial drug use were obtained with the aid of a pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using the SPSS software.

Results: Four hundred and forty one (441) patients completed the questionnaire. Respondent knowledge of malaria with respect to description of malaria decreased (42.7% to 0.2%). Almost all the patients were able to describe the causes and symptoms of malaria. One hundred and sixty nine (38.3%) frequently treated their malaria with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) combination, Three hundred and eighty two (86.6%) reported to have used oral preparation, almost half of the respondents (47.6%) obtained these medications from many sources apart from hospitals, only two hundred and forty eight reported to comply to treatment. Majority of the participants always used some methods for the prevention of malaria.

Conclusion: Concerted effort should be made to educate the population on malaria as well as the importance of drug adherence. Provision of ACTs at subsidized costs will go a long way in improving malaria treatment services in Nigeria, indigenous plantations for cultivating active ingredients and local manufacturing of ACTs is further expected to lower the costs of the drugs and increase its utilization and lower the incidence and impact of malaria. It will be important for interventions to be directed at educating the consumers on malaria pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy and prevention and importance of drug adherence in order to improve the quality, efficacy of treatments and to reduce local morbidity and mortality in the future.

Author(s) Details

Modupe I. Builders
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Bingham University, Karu, Nasarawa State, Nigeria.

Dr. Jonah Y. Peter
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria.

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View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/ctdah/v1

Productivity of Some Hausa Potato Accessions (Solenostemon rotundifolius (Poir) J. K. Morton in Jos-Plateau Environment | Chapter 06 | Advances and Trends in Agricultural Sciences Vol. 1

The Hausa potato (Solenostemon rotundifolius (Poir)) J. K. Morton is a tropical, multipurpose crop with different economic values. Its productivity is, however, low in terms of fresh tuber yield in the accessions available for cultivation in Nigeria. Consequently, many farmers are not encouraged to cultivate the crop, thereby limiting its popularity. This study was, therefore, designed to screen different accessions of the Hausa potato for productivity in the Jos-Plateau environment, Nigeria. The nine accessions (Manchok 1, Manchok 2, Bokkos 1, Bokkos 2, Bikka-Baban, Mujir, NRCRI, (White), Tukwak and Langtang) were laid out in a randomized complete block design with five (5) replications. Results indicate that percentage emergence, number of branches per plant, leaf area index (LAI), days to flowering, number of flowers per plant, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate, tuber length, tuber girth, root-top ratio, stand count at harvest, mean tuber weight, dry matter content and fresh tuber yield varied with accessions. Positive correlations were observed between the number of branches and number of flowers and mean tuber weight, root-top ratio and tuber yield, relative growth rate and net assimilation rate, tuber length and harvest index, relative growth rate and harvest index, tuber length and mean tuber weight as well as harvest index. The relative growth rate and net assimilation rate were also positively correlated. Moisture content was negatively correlated with nitrogen free extract. Protein was positively correlated with NFE (0.553*), but negatively correlated with calcium (-0.855**). Ash content and iron were negatively correlated (-0.655*). Total tuber yield was generally low in all the accessions. The positive associations among some growth and yield attributes suggests that these attributes could be used as selection indices in the improvement of the Hausa potato. The crop has the potential to address vitamin C deficiency in children. There is, therefore, the need to intensify research and popularize the production and consumption of the crop. The study also suggests investigation into the source-sink relationship in the Hausa potato.

Author(s) Details

Ms Seun Abimbola Opaleye

Cytogenetics and Plant Breeding Unit, Department of Plant Science Technology, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria.

Dr. Timothy Otsnjugu Aku Namo

Cytogenetics and Plant Breeding Unit, Department of Plant Science Technology, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria.

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View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/atias/v1