Starch Phosphorylase: Biochemical and Biotechnological New Perspectives | Chapter 3 | Theory and Applications of Microbiology and Biotechnology Vol. 3

A dynamic mediatory role between starch synthesis and degradation has been ascribed to starch phosphorylase. However, plant starch phosphorylase is largely considered to be involved in phosphorolytic degradation of starch. It reversibly catalyzes the transfer of glucosyl units from glucose-1-phosphate to the non-reducing end of glucan chain with the release of inorganic phosphate. It is widely distributed in plant kingdom. Enzyme multiplicity is also common in starch phosphorylase and different multiple forms have been predicted to have different roles in starch metabolism. Here, various biochemical properties have been reviewed. Its regulation by aromatic amino acids has also been discussed. Importance of plastidial and cytoplasmic starch phosphorylase has also been discussed. Various biotechnological aspects have been discussed. Its exploitation in production of glucose-1-phosphate, a cytostatic compound has been discussed in the present review.

Author(s) Details

Dr. Anil Kumar 
School of Biotechnology, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Rd., Indore-452001, India.

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Meditator’s Non-contact Effect on Cucumbers | Chapter 04 | Theory and Applications of Physical Science Vol. 3

We clearly show a non-contact effect in which the “presence” of a test subject (meditator) inside a pyramidal structure (PS) affects biosensors without making any physical contact. This is the world’s first report to show this type of effect by scientific measurements. We used edible cucumber sections as the biosensors and measured the concentrations of gas emitted from the sections by a technique developed by our group. The concentrations of gas emitted from biosensors were measured for a total of 1152 sample petri dishes; each dish contained four cucumber sections so that a statistically meaningful comparison could be made. We found that there was a statistically significant difference (p=8.7×10-9, Welch’s t-test, two-tails) in the concentration of emitted gas depending on whether the meditator was present or absent in the PS. Our experimental results clearly indicated that there was a scientifically measurable effect on biological objects with which the meditator had no direct physical contact.

Author(s) Details

Osamu Takagi [Ph.D. (Sci.)]
International Research Institute (IRI), 1108-2 Sonno, Inage, Chiba 263-0051, Japan.

Masamichi Sakamoto [M.A.Sc.]
Aquavision Academy, 1228-3 Tsubuura, Narita, Chiba 287-0236, Japan.

Hideo Yoichi [M.A.]
International Research Institute (IRI), 1108-2 Sonno, Inage, Chiba 263-0051, Japan.

Kimiko Kawano [Ph.D.]
International Research Institute (IRI), 1108-2 Sonno, Inage, Chiba 263-0051, Japan.

Mikio Yamamoto [Ph.D.(Med.), Ph.D.(Engin.)]
International Research Institute (IRI), 1108-2 Sonno, Inage, Chiba 263-0051, Japan.

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