Core Dimensions of Organizational Culture in a Research and Development Organization in Tamil Nadu, India | Chapter 02 | Emerging Issues in Science and Technology Vol. 1

The research paper aims to analyse the core dimensions of Organizational Culture in a R&D institution that is completely dedicated to research in Basic and Allied Sciences. The sole purpose of this research is to capture those dimensions amenable to R&D activities in this organization that will lead to higher R&D performance. The research examines factors like Strategy, Structure, Resources, Risk taking, Job & Role Characteristics, Team Dynamics, Collaboration & Networking, Leadership, Reward System, Safety & Health and Customer Satisfaction in the context of the organization. Research data was collected using a questionnaire from a sample of (n = 110) respondents within the institute. All the variable items for Organisational Culture were measured using a five-point Likert scale. Parametric and Non-Parametric tests were used to analyze the dimensions of culture, relationship between organizational culture and job satisfaction of employees and also the influence of demographic factors on organizational culture.The paper also includes recommendations to guide the management of the organization to identify and inculcate cultural values that will enhance R&D activities and to gradually abandon those practices that hinder creativity and innovativeness among the employees.

Author(s) Details

Vijaya Mani
SSN School of Management, Kalavakkam, Tamil Nadum 603110, India.

Ramyaa Shree S.
SSN School of Management, Kalavakkam, Tamil Nadum 603110, India.

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Culture, Child Preference and Fertility Behaviour: Implications for Population Growth in Cross River State, Nigeria | Chapter 01 | Perspectives of Arts and Social Studies Vol. 3

The study sought to examine the effects of culture on child preference and its implications for fertility behaviour as well as population growth in Cross River State, with a view to isolating factors which will be of importance to policy makers and planners in addressing high fertility levels. Data for the study was drawn from the 18 LGA’s of the State. A total of 1200 respondents were selected from the population of study (ever married persons). Data for the study was gathered using a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques of data collection. The study found that because the society is patrilineal in nature, with descent traced only through the male patriarch, there was a strong preference for male children, which in turn affects the fertility behavior of the people. The Pearson chi-square calculated for child preference and fertility behaviour revealed a likelihood ratio of 29.49; while the result for family size and fertility was 103.14 and 199.53 for socio-cultural norms and values. These results indicate that, the calculated chi-square for all the variables is higher than the table chi-square. Thus the stated hypotheses were accepted. Again, the multiple regression analysis also showed that of all the independent variables analyzed, child preference had a regression weight of 1.292 and a correlation coefficient of r=0.89, which indicates that there was a strong preference by couples for male children, with a resultant increase in the actual family size, thus contributing to the continuous growth in the population of the state. This situation, the study found, is given impetus to by the cultural norms and values prevalent in the State, which enhances and sustains male child preference. The study calls for a comprehensive development of the state, especially the rural areas, as one of the remedies for curbing those aspects of the culture that support and sustain male child preference and high fertility.

Author(s) Details

Igbolo Magdalene Agbor (Ph.D)

Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Science, University of Abuja, P.M.B 117, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria.

Read full article: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/view/77/1042/735-1

View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/pass/v3

Brucellosis of Testis and Epididymis: An Update of the Literature | Chapter 09 | Current Trends in Medicine and Medical Research Vol. 4

Background: Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease which has the ability to afflict a number of organs and tissues.  Brucellosis  epididymoorchitis  (BEO),  a  complication  of  human  brucellosis,  can  emanate  in complications. In brucellosis non-endemic areas, some clinicians may be unfamiliar with the disease entity which may lead to delay in the diagnosis.

Aim: To review the literature on BEO, in order to document its presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome following treatment as well as update the literature related to the disease.

Methods: Various internet data bases were usedto obtain literature on BEO.

Results  /  Literature  Review: BEO (epididymitis  plus  or  minus  orchitis)  is  a  complication  of  an infection  caused  by  brucella  species  which  can  be  transmitted  via  contact  through  the  respiratory tract, skin, or conjunctiva, and through the gastrointestinal tract pursuant to ingestion of unpasteurized milk/milk products or raw infected meat. BEO does in endemic areas affect 2% to 20% of patients who have been afflicted by brucellosis but the disease can also be encountered sporadically globally in non-endemic areas. BEO could at times be bilateral. The manifestation of BEO is non-specific and it could be mistaken for non-specific epididymo-orchitis or epididymitis or testicular tumour or abscess. Ultrasound  scan  and  MRI  scan  findings  are  not  specific  to  BEO.  Diagnosis  of  BEO  may  be established by (a) history of contact, (b) cultures from blood/epididymal aspirations, (c) various types of laboratory studies including: (I) Culture, (II) PCR, and (III) serology. Laboratory test criteria for the diagnosis  of  Brucellosis  is  divided  into  (I)  those  for  presumptive  diagnosis  and  (II)  those  for confirmatory diagnosis: BEO can be effectively treated by means of combination chemotherapy for about six weeks but at times orchidectomy or drainage of testicular collection  may be necessitated for persistence of symptoms or suspicion of a tumour / testicular abscess. Relapses of brucellosis can occur hence careful follow-up of patients is required.

Conclusions: BEO can occur anywhere globally. A high index of suspicion is thus  required  from clinicians in order to establish early diagnosis of the disease. Most cases of BEO can be effectively treated with combination chemotherapy for about 6 weeks. Clinicians should be aware that brucellosis epididymo-orchitis, brucellosis  epididymitis  and  epididymo-orchitis  exist  and  this  condition  could  be unilateral or bilateral, though more commonly encountered in brucellosis endemic areas because of global travel the disease entity may be encountered sporadically globally.

Author(s) Details

Mr Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo MB ChB FRCS(Ed) FRCSI FGCS Urol. LLM

Department of Urology, North Manchester General Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Read full article: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/view/43/188/336-1

View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/ctmmr/v4