Using GIS to Assess the Contribution of Farming Activities towards Climate Change in the State of Mississippi | Chapter 10 | Current Perspectives to Environment and Climate Change Vol. 3

The study uses primary data, descriptive statistics, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and correlation analysis to analyze the contributions of farming activities to climate change in Mississippi between 1992 through 2002. This involved the assessment of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the state of Mississippi as well as the relationship between the levels of methane gas concentration and other variables associated with rice production. In highlighting the extent to which rice production activities fuel climate change, the results of the study not only showed greenhouse gas emission related rice production activities to be on the rise, but there is a relationship between methane emissions and rice farming. The GIS analysis also points to a visible concentration of rice production activities associated with methane emissions in the major counties of Bolivia, Sunflower and Washington along the Northwest portion of the state. While this raises the threats of climate change predictors in the area. To remedy the problems, the paper suggests five future lines of actions from the need for education to the promotion of emission trading.

Author(s) Details

Edmund C. Merem
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Yaw A. Twumasi
Department of Urban Forestry and Natural Resources, Southern University and A&M College, 102 C Fisher Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA.

Joan Wesley
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Emmanuel Nwagboso
Department of Political Science, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch, Jackson MS, 39217, USA.

Siddig Fageir
Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch, Jackson MS, 39217, USA.

Marshand Crisler
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Peter Isokpehi
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Duro Olagbegi
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Mohammed Alsarari
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Coney Romorno
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

View Book : http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/131

The Analysis of Coal Mining Impacts on West Virginia’s Environment | Chapter 03 | Emerging Issues in Science and Technology Vol. 1

Aims: The paper analyzes the impacts of coal mining activities on West Virginia’s environment using GIS.

Study Design:  Adopted a  mixscale appoach.

Methodology: The aproach is applied to GIS and primary data connected to descriptive statistics by analyzing the impacts of mining with data collected at the state, county and watershed level.

Place and Duration of Study: The coal producing counties of West Virginia May 2010-December 2012.

Results: The study shows changes in coal production, and widespread degradation resulting in land loss and  open space, impacts on mountain ecosystem and water quality decline in the head waters and human casualities.The spatial analysis revealed the dispersion of mining activities onto senstive environments comprising of streams and mountain ecosystems.

Conclusions: The assessment of these trends and the capability of GIS in pinpointing them enhanced our research and understanding of ecosystem vulnerability in the face of recurrent degradation induced by mining. GIS also provided a framework for assessing ecosystem decline. To remedy the problems, the paper offered suggestions ranging from corporate code of ethics to improved data infrastructure and more use of GIS in environmental decision making.

Author(s) Details

Edmund C. Merem
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Yaw A. Twumasi
Department of Urban Forestry and Natural Resources, Southern University and A&M,102 C Fisher Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA.

Joan Wesley
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Emmanuel Nwagboso
Department of Political Science, Jackson State University,1400 Lynch, Jackson MS, 39217, USA.

Siddig Fageir
Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology, Jackson State University,1400 Lynch, Jackson MS, 39217, USA.

Marshand Crisler
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Peter Isokpehi
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Duro Olagbegi
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Mohammed Alsarari
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Coney Romorno
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

View Books: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/110

Analyzing Water Resource Issues in the State of Mississippi | Chapter 01 | Emerging Issues in Science and Technology Vol. 1

Aims: The paper assesses water resource issues in the state of Mississippi using GIS mapping.

Study Design: Adopted a mixscale appoach.

Methodology: The aproach is applied to GIS and primary data connected to descriptive statistics by analyzing the impacts of water use through data collected at the state, county and regional level.

Place and Duration of Study: The counties of Mississippi between Spetember 2010-December 2013.

Results: The study shows a rise in pumpage among different sectors and a widening of boil water alerts triggered by pollution and standard violations. With the vulnerability to water stress, and potential scarcity from climate change. Regional comparisons point to the exposure to accumulative groundwater depletion since the past several decades. While the spatial analysis revealed the concentration of extensive groundwater water use and emergence of cone formation in the northwest region of the state, the threats of contaminated sites, E. coli and coliform outbreak were evident across space.

Conclusions: The assessment of these issues showed the capacity of mix scale approach in highlighting the susceptibility of Mississippi’s water resources to degradation. From the spatial patterns, the northwest and the south west area showed more concentration of higher pumpage than other areas. Added to that is the notable presence of contaminated sites on areas adjacent to water resources. In the process, mix scale approach enhanced our research and basis for appraising water resource use. To mitigate the issues, the paper outlined five recommendations ranging from education to the need for data infrastructure design and more use of GIS in water resource management. The paper also outlined its contributions and areas for future research.

Author(s) Details

Dr. Edmund C. Merem
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Yaw A. Twumasi
Department of Urban Forestry and Natural Resources, Southern University and A&M,102 C Fisher Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA.

Joan Wesley
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Emmanuel Nwagboso
Department of Political Science, Jackson State University,1400 Lynch, Jackson MS, 39217, USA.

Siddig Fageir
Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology, Jackson State University,1400 Lynch, Jackson MS, 39217, USA.

Marshand Crisler
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Peter Isokpehi
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Duro Olagbegi
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Mohammed Alsarari
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

Coney Romorno
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 101 W Capitol Street, Jackson MS, 39201, USA.

View Books: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/110