Soil Carbon Sequestration: Basis & Basics | Book Publisher International

Global warming caused by the greenhouse gases has resulted in unprecedented climatic changes. Various anthropogenic as well as natural processes serve as sources for emission of carbon dioxide, the most potent greenhouse gas. Soil carbon stocks, a key determinant of soil health is getting depleted at a fast rate, indirectly placing the global food security at stake. Considerable variability in the soil organic carbon stocks exists in above and below ground phytomass, which vary with latitude and climatic regions and with different land use systems. The recalcitrant carbon fraction not only reduces the losses of soil organic carbon but also serve in locking up the carbon by way of soil carbon sequestration thus reducing carbon dioxide emissions and global warming to a considerable extent. Soil carbon sequestration includes a host of technologies that are employed which has the potential to greatly reduce, capture and store carbon produced both by anthropogenic factors and natural means in the soil. Mitigative and adaptive strategies of carbon sequestration are largely based on natural processes, engineering techniques and chemical transformations. A judicious land use and prudential adoption of recommended management practices is the need of the hour. While tillage based agriculture damages the soil, conservation agriculture builds soil quality, protects water quality, increases biodiversity and sequesters carbon. Pyrolytic production of biochar holds much prospect for soil carbon sequestration.

Author(s) Details

Dr. Naveen Leno
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Kerala Agricultural University, Vellayani, India.

View Book: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/122

Global Coordination: Weighted Voting | Chapter 12 | Emerging Issues and Development in Economics and Trade Vol. 3

In order to halt the depletion of global ecological capital, a number of different kinds of meetings between Governments of countries in the world has been scheduled. The need for global coordination of environmental policies has become ever more obvious, supported by more and more evidence of the running down of eco-logical capital. But there are no formal or binding arrangements in sight, as global environmental coordination suffers from high transaction costs (qualitative voting). The CO2 equivalent emissions, resulting in global warming, are driven by the un-stoppable economic expansion in the global market economy, employing mainly fossil fuel generated energy, although at the same time lifting sharply the GDP per capita of several emerging countries. Only global environmental coordination on the successful model of the World Band and the IMF (quantitative voting) can stem the rising emissions numbers and stop further environmental degradation. However, the system of weighted voting in the WB and the IMF must be reformed by reducing the excessive voting power disparities, for instance by reducing all member country votes by the cube root expression.

Author(s) Details

Jan-Erik Lane
University of Genova, Genova, Switzerland.

View Book: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/120