The Importance of Undergraduate Coursework in Student Success at South Carolina Medical Institutions | Chapter 04 | Current Research in Science and Technology Vol. 3

The importance of undergraduate coursework in determining medical school student readiness reaches far beyond preparation to take the standardized Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT®). Since medical schools employ a rigorous and fast-paced learning system to instruct prospective medical students on (A) didactic information in the basic sciences and (B) the critical methodology of clinical practice, it is essential for applicants to be well -equipped for the challenge that this type of scholarship requires. A research study investigated current medical students enrolled at the four medical schools in the State of South Carolina: The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), University of South Carolina College of Medicine Columbia (USCSOM-Columbia), University of South Carolina College of Medicine Greenville (USCSOM-Greenville) and Edward Via College of Medicine Spartanburg (VCOM-Spartanburg). Questionnaires were distributed in the form of Google surveys to all medical institutions in order to distribute them to all students enrolled (M1-M4). The results were received, compiled, and analyzed. The data demonstrated striking similarities in the responses received from medical students representing all four professional schools regarding their evaluation how well they were prepared as undergraduates. The significance of these results is discussed.

Author(s) Details

Halford G. Warlick IV.
Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA.

Gabriel N. Desouza
Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA.

Megan L. Wander
Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA.

Vincent S. Gallicchio
Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA.

View Books: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/book/109

Role and Effectiveness of Simulation-based Training in Raising Family Medicine Residents’ Clinical Resuscitation and Critical Care Skills | Chapter 10 | Modern Advances in Pharmaceutical Research Vol. 2

Background: Family medicine (FM) physicians are bound to providing healthcare services at a variety of clinical and community settings. They should be equipped to competently handle health emergencies in a multitude of professional procedures. Medical education on patients often raises safety issues; simulation-based medical education (SBME) was a solution enabling education in a risk free environment.

Aim: To analyze the impact of a SBME on Family medicine residents’ performance in critical resuscitation procedures.

Methods: A systematic review of published articles between 1996 and 2016 was conducted. Systematized literature search through ranked search engines was done. All original research articles on SBME published between 1997 and 2012 were examined.

Results: The analysis included 6 relevant studies selected. The studies’ venues included either academic or healthcare settings in Netherlands, Switzerland; Greece, and Canada. The studies’ populations were mainly family medicine, and general practitioner, residents who participated in simulated resuscitation/life support educational activities. The number of participants in each SBME activity ranged between 28 and 72. The study of the Greek experiment included 434 residents. An interventional design was advocated, and a self-reported questionnaire to evaluate participants’ skills pursuant to SBME activities before and/or after the learning activities was unanimously utilized. The main SBME focus involved patient resuscitation and critical event care. Most studies came to significantly positive conclusions about SBME in raising residents’ resuscitation knowledge, skill, and behavior.

Conclusions: The role of interactive SBM teaching in preparing FM residents to rescuing and resuscitating the critically ill independently is now sufficiently evident. Despite such success potential, methods to achieve improved critical care competence advocating low cost simulated medical education solutions in low economic circumstances should be sought.

Author(s) Details

Dr. Majed Kh. Al Harthi
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical Education Fellowship, University of Toronto, Canada.

Raouf M. Afifi (MD, PhD, MSc, MPH, MHA, FACHCE)
Community Health Research Institute, International Management-Health Services, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA and National Research Excellence Institute, Cairo, Egypt.

Dr. Mohamed A. Tashkandi
Department of Preventive Medicine, Directorate of Health Affairs, Makkah, MoH, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Dr. Ashraf E. Saad (MBBS, MPH, CIC)
Department of Preventive Medicine, Armed Forces Hospital, Wadi Al-Dawasir, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Yousef Afifi
Community Health Research Institute, International Management-Health Services, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA and National Research Excellence Institute, Cairo, Egypt.

Read full article: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/view/85/1203/846-1
View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/mapr/v2

Challenges of Curriculum Development for Health Sciences | Chapter 07 | Perspectives of Arts and Social Studies Vol. 3

There are many different theories for curriculum design and many affecting factors and challenges when setting or updating a curriculum. It is especially more challenging in health sciences when trying to link the usually knowledge based undergraduate teaching with the postgraduate competency based training. This paper is a literature review on challenges of curriculum development/ design in medical education in the period 1980 to 2012.

Literature review was conducted both manually and electronically with the objective to list challenges of curriculum design in health sciences as identified in relevant literature. It specifically looks into curriculum definition, standards, available models and resources among other things.  

A curriculum has at least four important elements: content; teaching and learning strategies; assessment processes; and evaluation processes.

A curriculum should set expectations for learners, advise the teacher what to do and help the institution monitor student learning and evaluate their education. It has to be flexible to adapt to changes and advances in medical education.

One of the biggest challenges is how to meet the demands of students, teachers and the health care system. Students need to identify principles in knowledge and learn to apply them to solve problems in the future.

Curriculum models are theoretically challenging. A choice of a specific model although not an objective by itself, is determined by different factors. This paper summarizes eight models for curriculum development.

Author(s) Details

Sarah Salih (MD, MBA, MA Health Management)

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Jazan University, Saudi Arabia.

Read full article: http://bp.bookpi.org/index.php/bpi/catalog/view/77/1048/741-1

View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/pass/v3