Brief Overview of Host-Parasite Relationships | Chapter 5 | Theory and Applications of Microbiology and Biotechnology Vol. 3

Host parasite relationships result from prolonged associations between organisms living in a given environment. The nature and extent of the association will determine the type of relationship existing between the co-habiting organisms. Host-parasite associations usually give rise to four main relationships namely parasitism, mutualism, commensalism and phoresis.

Author(s) Details
Dr. N. Ukibe
Solomon Department of Prosthesis and Orthopaedic Technology, School of Health Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria

N. Obi-Okaro Alphonsus
Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria.

R. Ukibe Nkiruka
Department of Human Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Science, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria.

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Sickle Cell Disease and Severity of Malaria | Chapter 08 | Current Trends in Disease and Health Vol. 2

Background: The relationship between sickle cell disease and malaria remains controversial and the hypothesis that sickle cell disease protects against malaria is widespread.

Methodology: A descriptive and retrospective study over a two-year period (2014-2016) was conducted in pediatric departments A and B of the National Hospital of Niamey (HNN). The objective is to assess the relative risk between sickle cell disease and the severity of malaria.

Results: Nine hundred and seventy four (974) patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum were included in this study. Thirteen point twenty four percent (129/974) of patients had sickle cell disease, of which 93.8% (121/129) had SS form and 6.2% (8/129) SC form. Seventy-nine point eight percent (103/129) of sickle cell patients had severe malaria (RR = 0.9, p = 0.17). Ninety six point one percent (99/103) of patients with severe malaria have SS hemoglobin versus 3.8% (4/103) who have SC hemoglobin  (RR = 0.6, p = 0.05). Eleven point forty three percent (4/35) of sickle cell patients died of malaria (RR = 0.1, p = 0.4). Seventy-five percent (3/4) of the deceased sickle cell have SS hemoglobin versus 25% (1/4) who have SC hemoglobin (RR = 5, p = 0.2).

Conclusion: Heterozygous sickle cell patients have less severe malaria than homozygotes. Malaria is more severe and more lethal in homozygous sickle cell patients. A strategy for the prevention of sickle cell malaria should be developed during periods of high transmission.

Author(s) Details

Maman Daou
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.
Hôpital National de Niamey, Niger.

Ibrahim Alkasoume
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.

Mahamadou Doutchi
Faculté de Médecine de l’université de Zinder, Niger.

Samaila Boubacar
Hôpital National de Niamey, Niger.

Mansour Maman Anou
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.

Mahamane Moustapha lamine
Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire de Niamey, Niger.
Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Sénégal.

Ramatoulaye Hamidou Lazoumar
Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire de Niamey, Niger.

Kamayé Moumouni
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.
Hôpital National de Niamey, Niger.

Djibo Yacouba Hamadou
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.

Ibrahim Maman Laminou
Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire de Niamey, Niger.

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