Haemostatic Disorders in Sickle Cell Disease Subjects in Nigeria: A Review of Literature | Chapter 02 | Emerging Research in Medical Sciences Vol. 2

Background: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterised with chronic anaemia and painful crisis. SCD is associated with hypercoagulability or prothrombotic state that can predispose to thromboembolic complications with increasing morbidity and mortality.

Aim: This study aimed to show the various documented haemostatic disorders and possible thromboembolic complications among SCD subjects in Nigeria.

Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using the internet search engines linked to academic databases including Pubmed, Google Scholar, Ebsco, Hinari, Scopus, etc. Studies involving hemostatic disorders in Nigeria were thoroughly searched, and the references of such articles were also searched for any probable relevant information.

Findings and Conclusion: There is a paucity of information on this subject in Nigeria, and there are inconsistencies in the available studies.

Haemostatic disorders in sickle cell disease are conditions that are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Further research on the level of natural anticoagulant is required to verify the correlation between haemostatic disorders and thromboembolic complications in SCD subjects in Nigeria

Author(s) Details

Dr. Kingsley Akaba (MBBch, FMCPath)
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

Dr. Marcus Inyama
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

Dr. Timothy Ekwere
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Uyo, Nigeria.

Dr. Obinna Iheanacho
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

Dr. Ekpeyong Bassey
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

Ushie Godwin
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

Dr. Hogan Archibong
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

Efiok Efiok
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

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Sickle Cell Disease and Severity of Malaria | Chapter 08 | Current Trends in Disease and Health Vol. 2

Background: The relationship between sickle cell disease and malaria remains controversial and the hypothesis that sickle cell disease protects against malaria is widespread.

Methodology: A descriptive and retrospective study over a two-year period (2014-2016) was conducted in pediatric departments A and B of the National Hospital of Niamey (HNN). The objective is to assess the relative risk between sickle cell disease and the severity of malaria.

Results: Nine hundred and seventy four (974) patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum were included in this study. Thirteen point twenty four percent (129/974) of patients had sickle cell disease, of which 93.8% (121/129) had SS form and 6.2% (8/129) SC form. Seventy-nine point eight percent (103/129) of sickle cell patients had severe malaria (RR = 0.9, p = 0.17). Ninety six point one percent (99/103) of patients with severe malaria have SS hemoglobin versus 3.8% (4/103) who have SC hemoglobin  (RR = 0.6, p = 0.05). Eleven point forty three percent (4/35) of sickle cell patients died of malaria (RR = 0.1, p = 0.4). Seventy-five percent (3/4) of the deceased sickle cell have SS hemoglobin versus 25% (1/4) who have SC hemoglobin (RR = 5, p = 0.2).

Conclusion: Heterozygous sickle cell patients have less severe malaria than homozygotes. Malaria is more severe and more lethal in homozygous sickle cell patients. A strategy for the prevention of sickle cell malaria should be developed during periods of high transmission.

Author(s) Details

Maman Daou
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.
Hôpital National de Niamey, Niger.

Ibrahim Alkasoume
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.

Mahamadou Doutchi
Faculté de Médecine de l’université de Zinder, Niger.

Samaila Boubacar
Hôpital National de Niamey, Niger.

Mansour Maman Anou
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.

Mahamane Moustapha lamine
Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire de Niamey, Niger.
Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Sénégal.

Ramatoulaye Hamidou Lazoumar
Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire de Niamey, Niger.

Kamayé Moumouni
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.
Hôpital National de Niamey, Niger.

Djibo Yacouba Hamadou
Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.

Ibrahim Maman Laminou
Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire de Niamey, Niger.

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