Consumers Involvements with Social Media in Saudi Arabia: A Marketing Perspective | Chapter 15 | Current Perspective to Economics and Management Vol. 4

Social network channels have sparked millions of users in almost to our society. Furthermore, these new tools of connection obtain users’ trust by interacting with them at a more profound level, as regional and worldwide marketing organizations have realized social networking as an underlying buying platform and have used this reform to encourage advertisement campaigns and marketing approaches by social networks channels. A company cannot stand in the market with the lack of social media channel now. Notwithstanding the increase of social networks and the widespread diffusion of different information means, limited studies have been done concerning the marketing perspectives of these channels of communication in the Arab region. The motive for this study is to examine the tool of these media and determinants that affect the purchasing behavior of the Saudi consumer. To study a sample of 226 respondents via. Google forms and monkey survey (online) using a close-ended questionnaire with the care of reducing non-response error was addressed in the research. For analysis descriptive (frequency distribution statistics), with the Chi-square goodness of fitness test at P. Value 0.05 (for hypothesis test) was applied and the outcomes were explained respectively in the research. In the result analysis, it is discovered that there is variance among the respondents in time duration spent on social media and purchasing preferences within the social media platform as well as a result shows that there is a remarkable difference in preferences in the use of social networking sites among the respondents.

Author(s) Details

Mohammad Zulfeequar Alam
Department of Marketing, College of Business Administration (CBA), University of Business and Technology (UBT), P.O.Box 110200, Jeddah 21361, Kingdom Saudi Arabia.

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Social Media Usage and Its Addiction Level among Generation Y Agricultural Scholars in Meghalaya, India | Chapter 02 | Current Perspective to Economics and Management Vol. 3

This study examined Generation Y’s psychological addiction to social media with specific regard to Research Gate, Facebook, YouTube, WhatsApp and Twitter. The addiction was deduced using Griffiths’ five components that govern behavioral addiction: tolerance, salience, withdrawal, conflict and relapse. The tenacity of this study was to clinch if Generation Y agricultural scholars’ was in fact addicted to social media because of their necessity to sustain their connections with peers. The study reveals that Research Gate was the most widely used social media (95.00 per cent). About ninety four per cent (93.75 per cent) of the respondents primarily used social media for downloading study materials. Eighty eight per cent of the respondents had more than five social media account. 76.25 per cent of the respondents spend more than 3 hour on social media. About seventy three per cent (72.50 per cent) of the respondents spend two hour on social media for agriculturally related issues. The major advantages of using social media is “exposure to latest knowledge, skills and technology in research endeavors” followed by “gaining more visibility in research areas” as reported by 95.00 per cent and 93.75 per cent of the respondents respectively. 68.75 per cent and 7.50 per cent of the respondents reported high addiction and low addiction on social media, respectively. The results indicated that Generation-Y agricultural scholars faced constraints towards tolerance, salience, withdrawal and relapse. However, they face intrapsychic conflict, but not interpersonal conflict. Major problem associated with social media in dissemination of information is “costly data charge for high speed internet connectivity” (91.25 percent) being followed by “erratic internet connectivity in the campus” (90.00 per cent).

Author(s) Details

Bai Koyu
School of Social Sciences, College of Post Graduate Studies, Central Agricultural University, Meghalaya, 793 103, India.

Rajkumar Josmee Singh
School of Social Sciences, College of Post Graduate Studies, Central Agricultural University, Meghalaya, 793 103, India.

Kankabati Kalai
Department of Extension Education, College of Agriculture, Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, 492 012, India.

Talom Dabi
School of Crop Improvement, College of Post Graduate Studies, Central Agricultural University, Meghalaya, 793 103, India.

Tanmoy Das
School of Crop Protection, College of Post Graduate Studies, Central Agricultural University, Meghalaya, 793 103, India.

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A Study on Role of WhatsApp in Agriculture Value Chains | Chapter 06 | Emerging Issues and Development in Economics and Trade Vol. 1

WhatsApp sends real-time messages and is one of the world’s most popular communication applications in the 21st century. The present study highlights and examines the domestication of WhatsApp among farmers. An exhaustive whatsapp user list was prepared from each village and 3 farmers were selected with the help of systematic sampling technique. Thus, 90 farmers from the 3 blocks of the district using whatsapp were purposively selected and grouped for sending the messages of agricultural aspects. The study was conducted at Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Neemuch during 2016-17. Results showed how farmers perceive WhatsApp as a ‘convenient’ communication application, problem solving with audio-visuals, on-time, solution at the time of crisis in their agriculture activities. Some of the critical issues arising from the use of WhatsApp included distractions and exposure to unregulated messages or information. Irrespective of its disadvantages, social media has proved to be an important platform for pluralistic extension, bringing together all the actors in Agriculture Information system and making them shareholders in development.

Author(s) Details

Dr. P. S. Naruka
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Neemuch, India.

Dr. Shilpi Verma
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Neemuch, India.

Dr. S. S. Sarangdevot
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Neemuch, India.

C. P. Pachauri
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Neemuch, India.

Dr. Shilpi Kerketta
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Neemuch, India.

Dr. J. P. Singh
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Neemuch, India.

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View Volume: https://doi.org/10.9734/bpi/eidet/v1